The Knightscope K7 is a crime-fighting robot for hire

If you have been to any shopping mall or parking lot in the US, chances are that you may have come across a few robots patrolling around the premises. This is the work of Knightscope, a security startup based in Mountain View, California, the United States. They have been producing “crime-fighting” robots for a few years now. Their earlier models, K3 and K5 have been doing just that. However, they have just revealed two more additions to the line up–the K7 sensor-laden dune buggy and the K1 stationary weapon detector.     

Trained for multi-terrain

So what’s so great about the company’s newest babies? For starters, the K7 is able to patrol grass, gravel, sand and other known terrains. The top speed however, is limited to 3mph (5kmh) but it is said to be able to travel faster. Like the K5, the new K7 is an autonomous buggy using a plethora of sensors and cameras that stream both audio and video to a human supervisor.

https://www.engadget.com/2017/09/20/knightscope-k7-looks-like-a-car/

The other offering, the K1, is a stationary bot that utilises milimiter-wave tech to scan for hidden weapons and other metal items. So, where is the K1 best to be used? Well, Knightscope says that it can be used in hospitals and airports. This makes check-in scanning a lot more efficient and convenient than having to use the old-fashioned scanners.

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http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170919005581/en/Knightscope-Delivers-Key-Milestones

Security as a service

8As of now, Knightscope sends out its bots for USD7 (MYR30) per hour which is half the cost of a human security guard. However, the bots do feature limited service by comparison. At most, they can do patrols and detect intruders but can’t arrest a person neither can customers program the bots themselves.

In contrast, the Singapore based startup, Otsaw Digital has their own autonomous bot called the OR-3 which has a drone to help aid operations further by scanning the path ahead for hazards and possible threats.

Source: The Verge, Engadget, Business Wire

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